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Thread: So small you can carry it with you! The Handie-Talkie of 1949.

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    Default So small you can carry it with you! The Handie-Talkie of 1949.

    A recent addition to my collection... this is a Low Band Handie-Talkie on 46.460. The (little bit) of information I can find online says that this is a "FPTR" pack set circa 1949. The Model number is P11-1A H, transmitter type TA120, and Serial number 695! Not in bad shape for its age.





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    Real Chrome! That's cool...

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    So, that screw cap next to the power switch must be where the programmer connection is, right?

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    Love those "chickenhead" knobs!!!

    I remember the smaller "lunch box" lo band transceivers which were smaller. Pretty sure those were transistorized.
    K1ngfish

    Supreme and Exalted leader of the Mystic Knights of the Sea

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    I had one of these in the Forest Service. Tubes and A batteries and B batteries. They weighed a ton. The one you have probably still works too!
    Retarded Mongoloid on PCP...

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    Quote Originally Posted by PossumCop View Post
    So, that screw cap next to the power switch must be where the programmer connection is, right?
    No. That's where you poured in the white gas. The primer pump is on the right side.
    Bow wow wow yippie yo yippie yay

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    Touche. (...and here I was looking for my tube-type RIB)

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    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Handy_Talkie_SCR536.jpg 
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    Now THAT's a real walkie-talkie :-)

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    Quote Originally Posted by SwissMoto View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Handy_Talkie_SCR536.jpg 
Views:	38 
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    Now THAT's a real walkie-talkie :-)
    Yeah... The SCR536 is on my list!

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    Quote Originally Posted by SwissMoto View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Handy_Talkie_SCR536.jpg 
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    Now THAT's a real walkie-talkie :-)
    That's why we call it the PTTLGTL button (push-to-talk-let-go-to-listen).
    Bow wow wow yippie yo yippie yay

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    The P11-1 represents the model number change that occurred around 1950 more or less, before that it would have been FPTR for the low band and FPTRU for the high band. You probably noticed that the little speaker hinges up so you can point it at your ear when wearing the thing as a backpack. There is room for two transmitters inside, they use modules that plug into "cells" like in a beehive. For awhile Motorola was producing these in a smooth hammertone silver-gray and for awhile within that time frame the chrome handle was a more tubular thing and shaped differently. Mine are all like yours, a wrinkle dark gray which seems to have been the first scheme. The screw cap covers the connector for an external power unit. I actually found that item on eBay last year (the power supply, not the screw cap.)

    These use most of the same modules as the "Handie Talkie" FHTR sets (the ones with the handset on top.) If one of the wire lead subminiature tubes gets a short between plate or screen and the filament line, all the tubes instantly burn out in that section. I tied a Zener across the filament line to ground to try to stop that from possibly happening in the future.

    I have some new photos of these sets that I will eventually get on the Motorola History web pages. It seems that 1957 would have been the last year for these, they were replaced by the hybrid two-tone pack sets that were being shipped by 1958.

    I have never found or seen one of these with the original low band antenna still in place. They are always missing and the later low band antennas from the P31 Dispatcher style pack sets don't fit without adding a male to female UHF connector extension piece. A pox on the people who removed and lost the antennas...

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    Quote Originally Posted by WB6NVH View Post
    I have never found or seen one of these with the original low band antenna still in place. They are always missing and the later low band antennas from the P31 Dispatcher style pack sets don't fit without adding a male to female UHF connector extension piece. A pox on the people who removed and lost the antennas...
    I actually have the little antenna loading coil, but not the whip. Somehow it disappeared before I picked this thing up.

    I love your website by the way... It has been my #1 resource while I have been sorting through an old radio shop from the 60's. Most of the Moto and GE gear (except the CA items) I have found while sorting through, although covered in 40 years of dust.

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    I think the whip sections were all the same up through the PT-300 series low band antennas. Not 100% sure though.

    The cost of crystals is the only thing stopping me from putting mine on the air on 10 Meters. That and whether I have to source a bunch of wire lead subminiature tubes. Some of the tubes became very hard to find when the Korean War started to pull resources away from normal production, and the situation never really recovered. This included Raytheon's production of these tubes, as I think they were the sole source unless Tung Sol made some. Even by the mid 1950's Motorola was sending bulletins out warning that stock of certain tube numbers was dwindling.

    I was thinking that those little Chinese DC-DC buck-boost converter boards on eBay might make it possible to run one of these radios off a single 12 Volt lead acid alarm style battery, or maybe a pair of them, eliminating the need for extinct A and B style batteries.

    I was surprised that these have relay squelch. In other words, once upon a time instead of electronic circuits that muted the audio stage electronically in the presence of "dead air" FM noise, this design uses a relay that pulls in and out based on the same principle, contacts of which turn the audio stage completely on and off. The squelch control adjusts the sensitivity of the relay. In practice this does not work as well as conventional noise squelch. This is the same system used on the Hallicrafters S-94 police monitor receivers from the same era. I guess the relay did make it easier to use these as a repeater in forestry towers, since the carrier operated relay was already built-in.

    I have seen cases of people buying these at hamfests only to later find out that all the plug-in modules have been removed! That doesn't really matter much if the radio is just for display and won't actually be used, but if the price is a bit steep it might pay to have a look inside before parting with money. Some cells will be empty by intent but most should be occupied.