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Thread: Kenwood NX-300K4

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    Default Kenwood NX-300K4

    At my job we are using Kenwood NX-300K4. I have used analog, APCO P25, Moto Trbo, etc., but this is my first NEXEDGE device. I have been told, when scanning, that I must turn off the scan feature to select a channel other than channel one. Is that common with Kenwood or is it a programming issue?

    Also, we use a reverse auto patch. I have been told that to answer the reverse auto patch, when there is an incoming telephone call, that the scan feature must also be turned off. Can anybody here confirm?

    I must say that the Kenwood audio, quality and features are different than Motorola.


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    I'm not personally familiar, but reading the manual shows there are any number of options which control how the radio behaves during scanning. "Scan Revert"

    Check out the manual for a description of some of these options. It may clue you in has to how the radio is programmed.

    https://www.ameradio.com/doc/Kenwood...ers_manual.pdf

    See page 28.

    To me, this sounds like a "training issue" where workers are instructed to perform a process which will produce the desired result most (all) of the time. Turning off scan for selecting other channels would take priority scan, scan revert, and channel scan out of the equation so the user ends up transmitting/receiving on the selected channel and is not confused by the radio scanning off somewhere else. Advanced users understand how their radio will behave in scan mode, but most folks do not know or care. The latter group are trained with this in mind.

    You could probably experiment and see how the radio performs under certain conditions without doing much harm -- other than wasting time of course.