Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Voting Recievers

  1. #1
    Trapa No Longer Registered

    Default Voting Recievers

    I would like to learn more information about voting recievers, possibly over tone, or IP links.

    I provide temporary radios for conventions and trade shows. We usually have a need to have a radius of only a couple blocks, so because of that we use usually 25 watt repeaters and such. However, because we are in hotels, often the concrete and metal stud construction leaves us with dead zones.

    I would like to come up with a way of using a voting reciever in order to get the best input from the handhelds, and output from the single antenna seems to be pretty good.

    Anyone have any suggestions?


  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 22, 2012
    Posts
    675
    Thanks
    282
    Thanked 424 Times in 194 Posts
    Country: United States

    Default

    Well, some questions need to be answered first. Is this a digital system, or analog? VHF or UHF? What kind of equipment do you generally use (manufacturer/model)?

    Generally speaking, for an analog system, you'd need a repeater, a voting comparator, and associated receivers. The receiver in the repeater itself is usually a part of the voting system, with the comparator providing the "repeat" functionality by keying the transmitter and passing the voted audio to it.

    Backhaul of the receiver audio to the comparator via IP can be done, but it requires very careful planning, and is generally not advisable. Dry pairs are the best way to do it.

    Without equipment that was designed for handling voting, you have to attach adjunct devices such as pilot tone generators, etc., to make it work properly, and that introduces it's own set of headaches.

    Voting is not available for platforms such as MotoTRBO and the like, so you either need to do it in analog ($$) or P25 ($$$$).

    If you can answer some of the above questions, we can better help you.

  3. #3
    maxkelley No Longer Registered

    Default

    Use Icom's IDAS digital, you can network repeaters and configure them as receive only and tell them to vote, all over IP.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 22, 2012
    Posts
    675
    Thanks
    282
    Thanked 424 Times in 194 Posts
    Country: United States

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by maxkelley View Post
    Use Icom's IDAS digital, you can network repeaters and configure them as receive only and tell them to vote, all over IP.
    Yeah, that's some high quality **** right there... :roll:

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 12, 2011
    Location
    Avalon
    Posts
    1,207
    Thanks
    291
    Thanked 322 Times in 157 Posts
    Country: United States

    Default

    It would probably be a good application for Trbo's Ip site connect. Its not voting but would be easy enough to get the same affect and increase your talk out penetration as well.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 03, 2012
    Posts
    63
    Thanks
    17
    Thanked 79 Times in 27 Posts
    Country: United States

    Default

    I was looking into doing something like this for a temporary ham system to cover a convention center for an event. My ultimate conclusion was that it wasn't worth my time for a hammy repeater, but I did get a handle on the various options in the process.

    The cheapest option would probably be analog voting using a Doug Hall 4RV/2 or something similar. You could do this two ways:
    1) Dry pairs, like d119 said. Of course this is an ideal way to do it, but can you rely on having access to dry pairs in every facility that you set up your system in?
    2) RF links. This is pretty complicated, at least for a temporary system. Getting a good quality signal from the remote receive site back to the voter will probably be the biggest challenge if you're in a large indoor facility. Directional antennas would be needed. Also, since you'd be running a commercial system, of course you'd have to license those link transmitters.

    There is a thorough writeup about voting and its challenges in this article: http://www.repeater-builder.com/rbti...receivers.html
    One of the most important things to note is that the receivers (and link transmitters, if you use them) should all have the same (or very similar) audio characteristics; otherwise the voting just won't work well.

    I don't know much about voting over IP, other than what I've read about these: http://www.micro-node.com/thin-m1.html
    Obviously you'll need an Ethernet connection, as well as an "master" Asterisk server. You'll also need a GPS for timing reference, I believe. This probably isn't the sort of thing that I'd want to rely on for event communications, though.

  7. #7
    maxkelley No Longer Registered

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by d119 View Post
    Yeah, that's some high quality **** right there... :roll:
    Have you heard it? It's not bad at all... better sounding than TRBO, I swear!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 12, 2012
    Location
    Directly above the center of the earth.
    Posts
    2,678
    Thanks
    793
    Thanked 1,343 Times in 664 Posts
    Country: Christmas Island

    Default

    I would tend to think it would be similar, I believe all the newer digital methods are using AMBE+ (or AMBE2?) for their vocoders, so Trbo, NxDN, and IDAS probably will all sound fairly similar. The underlying modulation technique is different, but once converted to a bitstream, the codec's actions are the same.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 22, 2012
    Posts
    675
    Thanks
    282
    Thanked 424 Times in 194 Posts
    Country: United States

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by maxkelley View Post
    Have you heard it? It's not bad at all... better sounding than TRBO, I swear!
    I'm more concerned with equipment longevity and build quality. In my experience, ICOM equipment has been notorious for poor build quality, poor MTBF, and the list goes on. Might as well buy Fisher-Price. Thank God they don't have a stronghold in the public safety community in any MAJOR metro areas. I digress.