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Thread: Motorola Saber Battery Plastic what is it?

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    Default Motorola Saber Battery Plastic what is it?

    Does anyone recall the type of plastic used by Motorola for their Sabers, specifically the batteries?

    I just sawed apart a short battery to try some 18500 lithium ion inserts and it was a previously repacked battery and Primecell (Cunard) used some sort of glue that was effective in welding and filling the previous saw cut. I want to find what kind of plastic and what glue works with it.


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    From a Motorola battery white paper:

    "For battery casings, Motorola uses tough polycarbonate plastic, which has significantly more tensile
    strength (the ability to resist lateral forces) and flexural strength (the ability to withstand flexing or
    bending) than ABS plastic."

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    I thought they had a name for it like Makrolon or similar.

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    I think at one time they advertised housings & batteries used Lexan. Makrolon and Lexan are nearly identical polycarbonates (PC) & should have similar compatibility with adhesives or epoxies rated for PC.

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    Does Makroblend sound familiar?

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    Makroblend is a PC/PET or PC/PBT blend. I don't have any first hand knowledge of this product, but looking at the spec sheet it shows adhesives suitable for Makrolon PC are also suitable for Makroblends.

    If the battery case is just PC you could try solvent welding with methylene chloride, the finished joint will be nearly as strong as the parent material. If you have a gap to fill some fabricators will dissolve a few % of PC sawdust or shavings into the methylene to aid in filling gaps.
    Last edited by kf8yk; Mar 24, 2020 at 03:31 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kf8yk View Post
    Makroblend is a PC/PET or PC/PBT blend. I don't have any first hand knowledge of this product, but looking at the spec sheet it shows adhesives suitable for Makrolon PC are also suitable for Makroblends.

    If the battery case is just PC you could try solvent welding with methylene chloride, the finished joint will be nearly as strong as the parent material. If you have a gap to fill some fabricators will dissolve a few % of PC sawdust or shavings into the methylene to aid in filling gaps.
    Looks like that is the way to go. Thanks; I will look for some methylene chloride and save the shavings.

    Makrolon is dissolved by:
    Chloroform
    Cresol
    Dioxane
    Ethylene Dichloride
    Methylene Chloride
    Pyridine

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    OK I got some of this IPS Weld-On #16 Cement for Acrylic Plastics 5 oz. A big tube. Should last a while. It was virtually the only available, affordable glue with nasty Methylene Chloride solvent. When I get this finished I will follow up on the results.

    https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/e1141...=loc,osub=osub

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    Quote Originally Posted by RFI-EMI-GUY View Post
    Does Makroblend sound familiar?
    Looks like you were spot on !

    Makroblend.jpg


    Interested by a follow-up about the mechanical properties and resistance of your Methylene chemical welding, 3 months after.

    I have a MS-DOS Compaq Contura laptop which has the housing and hinges very brittle & badly cracked and as the crack is growing everytime I use it, I don't want to end up with only the bare motherboard in the hands. It is made of Makrolon 6255, probably injection molded.

    If you were able to obtain a strong & resistant/durable bond, I'll probably use your method too, else I think epoxy will do the trick in a pinch (pretty sure Cyanolacrylate will not)

    Thanks

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    This is the product that I used. I had gaps to fill so put some grindings of the same plastic into a glass container and mixed with the glue on a toothpick to apply. Search on e-bay $9.95

    IPS Weld-On #16 Plastic Glue Cement for Acrylic Plexiglass 5 oz. Tube 16

    It has made a strong bond. I still have some small voids to mask off and fill, but it is not coming apart.

    I had tried superglue once to apply an escutcheon to a Saber and the glue reacted strongly. No damage done, but I would not recommend superglue.

    Drill the end points of any cracks with small drill bit to relieve the stress. This is a fix used by aircraft mechanics. You can fill them after making the repair.

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    Thank you very much for the detailed explanation ! Very appreciated.
    The only problem will be to find "some grindings of the same plastic" ^^ [although there's some broken compaq contura "dust covers" on eBay, that should probably do the trick...]

    (Now I need to find the same repair trick for an old Toshiba T1910, unknown plastic but I'm pretty sure it's some sort of ABS this time and not Makrolon... I can only see the epoxy solution this time, any idea ?)

    Again, thank you very much, maintaining these old PC is kinda important for me, but finding spare parts [reasonnably priced at least] is not for the faint of heart...

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    There is a guy on youtube called 8-BIT ? who restores old video game consoles and computers. His latest was about getting the yellow out of keyboards and PC housings with sunlight and hydrogen peroxide. He might have a video on plastic repair or surely has done some.

    The problem with plastics is that over time they out-gas whatever was bonding them together.

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    Yup, that's the 8-Bit Guy, and that's the Retr0bright. I will have to check, thanks for the reminder !
    [I will not digress any longer, as this is not a retrogaming forum; but the goals intersect as my 486 is as useful for RSS programming as it is to play DOOM the hardcore way ^^]

    Can confirm that pain about plastics, I have an old /\/\ Talkabout (nearly 20yo) which turned entirely oily, and then fully cracked at the slightest touch; that oil was the "plasticizer"...

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    Quote Originally Posted by RadioSkaf View Post
    Yup, that's the 8-Bit Guy, and that's the Retr0bright. I will have to check, thanks for the reminder !
    [I will not digress any longer, as this is not a retrogaming forum; but the goals intersect as my 486 is as useful for RSS programming as it is to play DOOM the hardcore way ^^]

    Can confirm that pain about plastics, I have an old /\/\ Talkabout (nearly 20yo) which turned entirely oily, and then fully cracked at the slightest touch; that oil was the "plasticizer"...
    I have a bunch of FRS radios from Panasonic that were actually pretty nice. Unfortunately all the rubber bumpers did exactly that, oozing sticky oil. I stripped out the boards and trashed the plastic.