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Thread: Timewave ANC-4 vs RFI from power lines

  1. #1
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    Default Timewave ANC-4 vs RFI from power lines

    Hi all,

    Anyone ever have success using this box to eliminate RFI from utility sources specifically? I've been having a serious issue with RFI that I suspect is being generated from a utility pole about one mile from my home. It impacts everything below 10m with an awful, harsh buzz between S7-S9 depending on the day. After a little direction-finding drive, I located two sources with the stronger one being a pole that is emitting an audible buzzing arc sound that can be heard over the traffic noise on the street. Power company gave me the "yeah, we will get out there to check it eventually" speech.

    I know lots of people have had success with this box nulling out appliances and such but I don't know of anyone who had a noise problem this bad from power lines saying that it helped. I built a noise dipole antenna and hung it outside about four feet off the ground broadside to the noise as the manual suggests but it doesn't even seem to be helping. It MIGHT drop the noise down by 1 S-unit (if that).

    Just curious to see if this thing has ever helped anyone else with the utility issues.

    Thanks!


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    I do know that people have thrown a piece of chain over the insulators in question and that worked to get the power company out. They did change the insulators....

    Of course, this is probably universally illegal.
    "God as my witness" - Jeremy Dewitte - Felon

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    My friend suggested throwing an impromptu party under the pole and releasing some Mylar balloons! That would probably get a faster response out of them. HF is pretty much unusable at home. It sucks.

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    The problem with power line noise filtering post demodulation are the number of harmonic components that appear all across the audible spectrum. Moreover, the RFI components raise hell with the receivers AGC that degrade the desired signal(s). Sometimes the noise waveform is more pulse like whereby pulse type noise blankers are helpful but not the cure all.

    Keep hammering on the power company if you're absolutely sure it's their transmission plant causing the interference, and keep calling to complain until you get their attention. In the meantime, a rotatable receiving loop might be helpful to null out some of the interference. I have uses a 1 meter rotatable loop here for many years to chase NDB's but it works well into the upper HF spectrum and is quite effective in nulling localized noise sources.

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    Great suggestion. I'll experiment with a loop and see where that gets me. Going to try a vertical also. I've made two calls to the power company already and was nice about it but I will start to turn up the heat on them now. It's arcing loudly from the street level, so even if they aren't convinced that it is an issue from an RFI standpoint, something is not right up there. Eventually that insulator or whatever it is will fail.

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    It sounds like you've done your homework. I just wanted to toss in the "if you're absolutely sure it's their transmission plant" because there are so many devices that create RFI these days that it's unbelievable and wonder what the hell is the FCC (U.S.) thinking in this regard. Part-15, what a joke!!

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    My RFI only goes away when the power is off. Thank God I have a battery plant for my radios!
    "God as my witness" - Jeremy Dewitte - Felon

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    I have tried turning all power off to the house at the breaker and it's still there. I have even taken my gear out of the house to locations down the street, and in a local park about 1/4 mile away with no luck. That pole is just blasting noise like crazy. Now that I have identified the source, there hasn't been a long duration power outage where I can check to see if it goes away. But considering that the offending pole is about a mile away and is being fed from a different direction from my house, it would have to be something big to take out that much area. I agree with MotoBill that the waveform of the noise is so crazy that it's going to be hard for the box to get a good null on it. It's just frustrating that the few stations I can actually try to dig out of the noise give me great signal reports - but I can barely hear them. Interestingly, a neighbor who also has his license has a vertically polarized antenna and said it is much less evident to him. I don't really have the space to put up a vertical and then have to deal with the radials. But I'm going to keep on being a pest to the power company in the meantime.

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    It may depend upon the state and area you are in but now days there's more of an awareness on the (fire) hazards of malfunctioning utility equipment than in the past.

    If the arcing is audible, you might try complaining to whatever agency regulates public utilities, not even mentioning the RFI issue (since they aren't concerned about this) but expressing concern about fire hazards, potential services outages due to failures, etc. In some states, if you make a formal complaint to the regulatory agency, the utility has to report back on what they have done to fix it.

    A regulatory agency complaint will usually get a response much more quickly than a regular consumer complaint as they have special staff assigned to deal with them.

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    Very good suggestion. We have a regulatory agency here in my state that handles utility companies. I am going to give them a month to resolve it before I follow up again. I want to be reasonable.

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    I had an instance of bad insulator about 10 years ago that I couldn't get them to come out. After a month of s9+ crud I called again and said "Listen you got a problem, its wasting electricity your not getting paid for and it's against FCC regs. If you don't want to expedite getting someone out there I will take care of it for you and report you to the FCC and will let them take care of it."

    They came out the next day and fixed it, then apologized to me at my door for the issue and let me know I was right.

    One 30 years ago I had the power co come out with their sniffer. They were more interested in sniffing the Telrex monobander sitting on the ground in my backyard than they were their own poles. They were convinced my antenna on the ground was radiating it.

    LMAO
    Officer Ogletree Officer Ogletree Officer Ogletree SIR Officer Ogletree Officer Ogletree PLEASE!

    Sarjint I'm asking...no I'm DEMANDING a Lieutenant....Or a supervisor that outranks him....J Dewitte.


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    Good point. I'm going to follow up at the 30-day mark, I think that's a reasonable amount of time. We haven't had any large storms or anything recently that would be backing them up. I'm going to put it in writing this time with my previous ticket number and let them know I'm going to be reaching out to the FCC (regarding the interference to broadcast bands, including commercial AM) and the Board of Public Utilities (for the unaddressed safety issue). I would think if/when someone actually goes out there and hears this thing they would agree it's eventually going to burn through the insulator, or whatever is causing a ground. After I go through all this, I'm hoping it's not something else causing the interference

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    Quote Originally Posted by pdblues View Post
    Hi all, Anyone ever have success using this box to eliminate RFI from utility sources specifically?
    I'm always a week or two late on these things, hopefully you're still paying attention.

    Yes, I've had a great deal of success using the ANC-4 for power line noise. They can be quite effective. I had a 40db over S9 noise level, and it could bring the noise down close to zero.

    There's a trick with these things. The noise antenna needs to be hearing the same noise that the main receiver is hearing. If the source is a mile or more away, that means a separate outside antenna just receiving noise. The built in whip antenna probably won't help much unless the source is much closer.

    I've found trying to track and fix powering noise is mostly an exercise in aggravation. It is easier to null it out.

    A steerable loop antenna coupled with an ANC-4 is hard to beat.

    Hope that helps some...