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Thread: Difference between TRBO & APX UHF/GPS antennas (besides $50)

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    Default Difference between TRBO & APX UHF/GPS antennas (besides $50)

    Has anyone used both of these antennas and noticed a performance difference?

    FAF5260 - Motorola Stubby UHF / GPS Single Band Antenna 470-520 for APX at $60.00

    and

    PMAE4048 - UHF Stubby Antenna (w/GPS) 450-527 MHz for MotoTRBO at $10.50

    $60.00 is a little steep for a single band + GPS antenna unless of course there is a noticeable increase in performance. Or is this just a case of charging a premium for the top-tier accessories?


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    The XPR7550 uses an entirely different antenna connector. It's like a SMA, but without the center pin. 6550 uses a normal SMA.

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    That antenna is for the 6550, so it has the sma.
    "Don't worry about what I am, cause I'm a state agent so what you need to do is make sure your doing the right thing **** boy" -J. Dewitte

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    Both of these antennas are sma

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mars View Post
    The XPR7550 uses an entirely different antenna connector. It's like a SMA, but without the center pin. 6550 uses a normal SMA.
    Mars, is it the same style as what a Waris/Genesis/Saber radio would take? Or yet another type entirely?

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    No idea. I've never owned any of those before.

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    syntrx No Longer Registered

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    And in a bit of a twist, the XPR7550 IS (the fancy blue one) does use an SMA, for some reason.

    TRBO antennas don't fit well on XTS radios (at least) unless you remove the rubber O-ring on the antenna connector. I've never tried putting one on an APX, so I don't know if they're different.

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    He means the old-school "Motorola Stud" antennas - like the old MX's Sabers, GP300, basically everything past the HT220, which used a larger stud, up to the Jedi series which were the first to use SMA for all radios. Some radios before Jedi used SMA but notably only the 800 and 900 MHz units, the MX800, STX, GTX, MTX800, MTX900 all used the current SMA that nearly all Motorola's use now.

    The stud was almost exactly the same size as the SMA's are, but had a more coarse thread and would tear the crap out of the threads if you tried to screw in the wrong one! Later Motorola Stud antennas had a drilled-out hole so they wouldn't mash the pins of SMA's if you got the wrong one, but it would still cross-thread. The only drag about the stud antennas was no ground, it was antenna center hot conductor only. Some radios like the P50 had a nice ground ring around the hole that a special adapter could contact for a good ground if needed but the antennas had no ground coupling, they just floated.

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    I would bet the Trbo antenna will work fine.
    "Don't worry about what I am, cause I'm a state agent so what you need to do is make sure your doing the right thing **** boy" -J. Dewitte

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    Quote Originally Posted by exkalibur View Post
    Mars, is it the same style as what a Waris/Genesis/Saber radio would take? Or yet another type entirely?
    Similar, but different thread. GARY

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    syntrx No Longer Registered

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    Same thread as an SMA connector.

  12. #12
    standardmissile No Longer Registered

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alpha View Post
    He means the old-school "Motorola Stud" antennas - like the old MX's Sabers, GP300, basically everything past the HT220, which used a larger stud, up to the Jedi series which were the first to use SMA for all radios. Some radios before Jedi used SMA but notably only the 800 and 900 MHz units, the MX800, STX, GTX, MTX800, MTX900 all used the current SMA that nearly all Motorola's use now.

    The stud was almost exactly the same size as the SMA's are, but had a more coarse thread and would tear the crap out of the threads if you tried to screw in the wrong one! Later Motorola Stud antennas had a drilled-out hole so they wouldn't mash the pins of SMA's if you got the wrong one, but it would still cross-thread. The only drag about the stud antennas was no ground, it was antenna center hot conductor only. Some radios like the P50 had a nice ground ring around the hole that a special adapter could contact for a good ground if needed but the antennas had no ground coupling, they just floated.
    They may have free floated, but the sure as S**t sounded better when using CVSD compared to the Astro series radios.

    I miss my old VHF Securenet Sabers, they kicked arse. I just don't miss the MS-DOS based RSS.