Home Made Lexan Labels

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PRC148

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Anyone have any experience laminating stuff? I purchased some 10 mil frosted Lexan laminate but it's the thermal kind. The home laminator isn't doing the job. This stuff must need high heat. I attacked it with the clothing iron but the temp got too hi and caused it to warp up.

The places that did adhere look great. It's the same same stuff they use to make radio labels which has that sort of rough sparkly type of surface but is ultra durable. I'm trying to place it over printable vinyl stuff. I think part of my problem was not letting the ink dry long enough which allowed moisture to exist between the surfaces.

I only found one source for pressure sensitive 10 mil and they want $120 for 5 8x11 sheets !!! :bang:
 
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PRC148

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I found I needed to let them dry longer then run them through the laminator several times after cutting them down to smaller dimensions so they don't warp.

They turned out just like the factory Moto labels. It's that same tough plastic with the textured surface.

lexan label.jpg
 

CQDX

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Geeze, that looks great! Would be awesome to make some custom labels :)
 

mrtor

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Where did you get the raw product from ? Looks brilliant and I could use some even at the price you mentioned :)
Thanks in advance
Mike
 
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PRC148

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The inkjet printable vinyl with adhesive backing came from texascraft.com. It's called papilio white waterproof vinyl with permanent adhesive.
http://www.texascraft.com/hps/product.php?productid=17577&cat=&page=1

The 10 mil laminate came from Perfs Luminous Art Supply.
http://the-perf-shop-part-2.7p.com/10mil_lexan_polycarbonate.html

I used a cutter board to make 5x7 photo sized pieces of each material then ran them through a regular household laminator. The key is to set the printer to photopaper and the highest DPI for the smoothest image. I found you need to make sure all the moisture from the ink is gone before laminating or else it gets trapped and causes a haze. It takes several successive runs through the machine to get it hot enough to really adhere. You can tell it's done when the black turns very dark and is even throughout the label.
 

mrtor

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Thanks for that PRC148, I will go and browse the web
Cheers
Mike
 
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Firechild99

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Did you have to sandwich the vinyl between two pieces of laminate or did the vinyl hold up well enough in the laminator?
 
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PRC148

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It's a strange thing. The first time I did it I used a Wal-Mart cheapo Scotch brand laminator. It took a few runs through but worked. All of a sudden it seemed as if it didn't work any longer. I don't know what changed but it seemed as if it didn't get hot enough. I then tried the GBC laminator I have that has the gearing reversed to slow it down for PC board toner transfer use. That thing was way too hot. The peel off backing became an adhesive in and of itself and would stick to the rollers. After taking the machine apart five times I finally got wise. The key was to use aluminum duct work tape along the leading edge. It had the ability to stand up to the high temps and would keep the backing from peeling away. Once that leading edge made it past the roller everything was fine. I also used the lower temp setting which helped a bit. I think it might have been okay if I hadn't slowed the laminator down with the mod I did to it but at least now I can use it reliably without worry of it rolling up inside.


Did you have to sandwich the vinyl between two pieces of laminate or did the vinyl hold up well enough in the laminator?
 
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